Register for a Regional Stakeholder Engagement Meeting: 3/21

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for health and the National Vaccine Program Office invite stakeholders for a meeting focusing on adult immunization work in Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, DC.

Click here to register, and for full meeting details.

Wednesday, March 21
8.30 AM to 12.00 PM
College of Physicians of Philadelphia
Mitchell Hall, 2nd Floor
19 South 22nd Street
Philadelphia, PA

 

2017 Year in Review

Philadelphia Immunization Year In Review

To all of the providers and staff who are part of the Philadelphia Department of Public Health’s Vaccines for Children and Vaccines for Adults At Risk programs: 2017 was a terrific year—thanks to you. Click here for a PDF of this message.

Vaccines are one of the best public health interventions ever developed. When we achieve high vaccination rates, we protect everybody. Thanks to your hard work, Philadelphia has done a great job protecting its residents—especially its most vulnerable ones—through vaccines.

New School Requirements

Last spring, the state announced new school requirements. Philadelphia’s health care and educational communities mobilized quickly to ensure that students would have the required immunizations.  In particular, PDPH identified and sent letters to almost 30,000 adolescents who needed to get up-to-date on their MCV4 vaccinations—and Philadelphia’s health care providers admirably handled a significant surge in patients.

National Immunization Survey shows great results for Philadelphia

Every year, the National Immunization Survey (NIS) collects data on vaccines for children and teens, and provides reliable estimates of vaccination coverage that can be compared across states (and some cities).  The 2016 NIS—released this year—showed terrific performances for Philadelphia’s immunization coverage.

Similarly, Philadelphia’s pediatric immunization rates for 2016 exceed national rates—and many of them meet or exceed the related federal Healthy People 2020 goals.

High coverage rates protect us all from diseases—so keep it up!

When we achieve these high immunization rates, it means that people who are vaccinated don’t get sick. It means we help protect people who can’t be vaccinated, due to certain medical conditions. People are healthier, students can stay in school, adults can keep working, and we stop diseases before they start.

As a result of these high coverage rates, Philadelphia has very low numbers of the diseases that these vaccines prevent. The high coverage rates are working, by preventing outbreaks of disease.

Adults need shots too

So, we’ve been working with providers and pharmacists to increase adult immunizations throughout Philadelphia. And, over the past few years, adult vaccinations have been on the rise!

 

 

We’re all in this together

This year, PDPH has distributed $32 million worth of vaccine—over 540,000 doses shipped to you and 180 other providers in Philadelphia!

These numbers would mean nothing without your expertise, and commitment protecting the health of Philadelphia’s residents. Thank you.

 Vaccines save lives. On behalf of the Philadelphia Department of Public  Health, and on behalf of the entire city: Thanks for your hard work in 2017, and we look forward to 2018.

 

 

2018 Storage and Handling Update

Everybody involved in vaccine storage and handling – from when a vaccine is manufactured right up to when it’s given to a patient – is responsible for protecting the vaccine by maintaining the “cold chain.” This means storing it at the correct temperatures for the entire life of the vaccine.

The Philadelphia Department of Public Health has updated storage and handling guidelines for the Vaccines for Children (VFC) and Vaccines for Adults At Risk (VFAAR) programs. Click here for the full advisory.

Paper Temperature logs

Start using this the new log now. Please review the instructions to make sure you are documenting temperatures correctly.

Vaccine Management Plan

Print this out, fill in all the relevant information for your practice, and keep it near the vaccine storage plan.

Everybody involved in vaccine storage and handling – from a vaccine’s manufacture right up to its administration to a patient – is responsible for protecting the vaccine by maintaining the “cold chain.” This means storing it at the correct temperatures for the entire life of the vaccine.

The vaccine management plan ensures that you have a plan to protect the viability of VFC/VFAAR vaccines.

Emergency Vaccine Management Plan

Print this out, fill in all the information for your practice, and keep it near your vaccine storage units. Fax Page 1 to VFC/VFAAR at 215-238-6948 now, and whenever you make updates.

Out-of-range Temperature Response Form

If your vaccines are exposed to out-of-range temperatures, use this form to determine if you can still use the vaccines, – and to report your findings to us.

It’s still flu season – keep vaccinating!

Flu season is from October to May. The Philadelphia Department of Public Health encourages you to keep vaccinating: continue offering the flu vaccine to your patients.

Keep vaccinating patients until flu season ends, or your flu vaccines expire.

The flu is most dangerous for elderly people, young children, and people with compromised immune systems – the most vulnerable people we know. Giving flu vaccines to healthy people helps protect unhealthy and vulnerable people.

From October through December, there have been 6,221 cases of the flu in Pennsylvania – and 6 deaths, including one in Philadelphia. You can find up-to-date data on the Health Information Portal and more information at the CDC’s Seasonal Influenza Health Advisory.

It’s too soon to tell if this is shaping up to be a severe, average, or mild flu season – but cases are rising. Flu cases usually peak in January or February, so it’s important to protect people now.